“Conspiradentalism” and the murder of John F. Kennedy

“Conspiradentalism” and the murder of John F. Kennedy
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“Conspiradentalism” and the murder of John F. Kennedy

The murder of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963 put a dark cloud over every Thanksgiving celebration since, especially given the failure of the government to convincingly resolve the mystery of who was behind the assassination and the accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald. Many political forces had reasons to hate and despite JFK and their different reasons created an environment of parallel conspiracy I call “conspiradentalism.” 

By Ray Hanania

This week, 57 years ago, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated by what we were told was the amazing gunfire of Lee Harvey Oswald.

Even until today, I can’t get past that event to truly enjoy any Thanksgiving holiday. Personally, I think JFK was murdered as a result of a conspiracy of parallel hatred from an assortment of antagonists that came together all at one unfortunate time, and the government did everything to cover it all up.

Kennedy was fighting against the military industrial complex to end the war in Vietnam. With JFK out of the way, his vice president Lyndon Baines Johnson, a hawk influenced by the military’s strong presence in his home state of Texas, would grow the war and military profits.

Exact spot on Chappel Avenue where Ray Hanania was when he heard JFK had been assassinated. Warren Elementary School playground and school in the background, has been restructured. Photo 2017 courtesy of Ray Hanania

Exact spot on Chappel Avenue where Ray Hanania was when he heard JFK had been assassinated. Warren Elementary School playground and school in the background, has been restructured. Photo 2017 courtesy of Ray Hanania

Kennedy’s brother Robert was engaged in a dual fight, on one side battling the Mafia and on the other fighting FBI resistance to that war on organized crime. The FBI’s corrupt Chief J. Edgar Hoover believed the mafia threat was far less important than the threat from African American activists like the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

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Carlos Marcello who headed the New Orleans Mafia and expanded to Texas, under the direction of the New York crime families, was targeted by JFK’s brother Robert who was now the Attorney General. Kennedy wanted him deported. That order was rescinded after Kennedy was killed and Robert dethroned as Attorney General.

The mafia felt betrayed by the Kennedys, after all they had stolen the election in November 1960 in Chicago giving JFK the edge over former Vice President Richard M. Nixon. It’s called “voter fraud,” you know, that thing the mainstream news media claims today never happens. Kennedy won Illinois (27 Electoral votes) and Texas (24 Electoral votes), which were both Republican states, giving JFK the electoral votes he needed to win.

You needed 269 Electoral votes to win back then, and Kennedy had 303 and Nixon had 219. The 51 Texas and Illinois votes would have handed the election to Nixon.

The Kennedys and the Connallys in the presidential limousine moments before the assassination in Dallas Victor Hugo King, who placed the photograph in the public domain (presumably when he gave it to the Library of Congress). Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

The Kennedys and the Connallys in the presidential limousine moments before the assassination in Dallas. Victor Hugo King, who placed the photograph in the public domain (presumably when he gave it to the Library of Congress). Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Cuba’s Fidel Castro was both angry and elated. Castro had defeated America at the Bay of Pigs in April 1961 and survived multiple CIA plots to poison him. Castro engaged in a deadly game of chicken over the placement of Soviet nuclear weapons less than 100 miles from Florida.

Although LBJ’s Democratic organization in Texas carried the state for Kennedy – many said by voter fraud – Kennedy was ungrateful to LBJ and the two had terrible relations. Dallas, Texas was the heart of a vicious anti-JFK hate campaign, unprecedented levels driven by Republican politicians who believed the election was stolen and police who were unsympathetic.

The Dallas police never took evidence of threats against JFK seriously enough to protect the president.

Oswald had ties in both New Orleans, where he was born, and Dallas where his mother took him years later. He traveled to Russia in 1959 and renounced his citizenship in front of the U.S. Embassy, but never formally ended it. He returned to America with his Russian bride and infant daughter in June 1962.

Hoover’s hatred of the Kennedy’s clearly influenced his view of politics and criminal threats against the Kennedys. The FBI saw African Americans and the civil rights movement as being a great threat than Oswald, a Marxist traitor who returned to the country with his radical ideas.

When you put all that together, you realize that if Oswald was the real assassin, as the LBJ-appointed Warren Commission asserted, the widespread conspiracy of dislike came together creating the perfect kill zone on Nov. 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas.

The perfect patsy who was given a path to kill by this convergence of unrelated but parallel forces of anti-Kennedy hate.

I call it “conspiradentalism.” It’s a theory I have in which a conspiracy is created by a collection of unrelated actions that are driven by a shared emotional connection of anger and hate. The goals of those disjointed antagonists result in creating an environment in which a desired but unplanned event occurs, in this case, making it easy for Oswald to shoot JFK.

With LBJ in charge, it was easy to cover-up for the various factors from the FBI’s shortcomings, LBJ’s disdain for JFK, the level of threats in Dallas that went uninvestigated, the anger of the Mafia and Cuba’s Castro.

I’ll never believe that Oswald’s brilliance was the factor that resulted in burning in my memory the words I heard as I walked back to school after lunch that Friday afternoon on Nov. 22, 1963, “The President was shot.”

(Published in the Southwest News Newspaper group, Nov. 22, 2020. For more information on Ray Hanania’s writings visit www.Hanania.com.)

Ray Hanania

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