State Fire Marshal Reminds Illinoisans to “Change Your Clock, Change Your Batteries”

State Fire Marshal Reminds Illinoisans to “Change Your Clock, Change Your Batteries”
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State Fire Marshal Reminds Illinoisans to “Change Your Clock, Change Your Batteries”

Daylight saving time a reminder to test and change batteries in smoke alarms

The Office of the State Fire Marshal (OSFM) reminds Illinoisans to test and replace the batteries in their smoke alarms as daylight saving time ends this weekend and they turn their clocks back.

“The time change serves as a great reminder to test your smoke alarms and change the batteries in them,” says State Fire Marshal Matt Perez. “Parents can use this time to teach kids how to recognize the sound of smoke alarms and to practice their home fire safety plan.”

Daylight savings time promotion. A 2001 US public service advertisement reminded people to adjust clocks. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Daylight savings time promotion. A 2001 US public service advertisement reminded people to adjust clocks. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports between 2012-2016, almost three out of every five home fire deaths in the U.S. resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or non-working smoke alarms. In fires in which the smoke alarms were present but did not operate, more than two of every five of the smoke alarms had missing or disconnected batteries. Dead batteries accounted for 25% of smoke alarm failures. In Illinois, 79% of smoke alarms being replaced aren’t working.

A 2017 Illinois law required ten-year sealed smoke alarms be installed in all homes built before 1988 or that do not have hardwired smoke detectors by January 1, 2023.

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“The “Be Alarmed!” program is designed to help residents in Illinois comply with the new law, but it’s really aimed at creating fire-safe communities,” says Fire Marshal Perez. “By replacing alarms that have missing batteries or ones that are either expired or broken with new ten-year sealed detectors, this will help to reduce residential fire deaths across the state.”

“Be Alarmed!” is a fire safety education and smoke alarm installation program administered cooperatively between the Illinois Fire Safety Alliance (IFSA) and the Office of the Illinois State Fire Marshal (OSFM). This program provides ten-year, concealed battery smoke alarms to Illinois residents through their local fire departments and can aid with obtaining and installing these required alarms. Smoke alarms are required on every floor of the house and within 15 feet of every bedroom.

For more information on the “Be Alarmed!” program click here.

Ray Hanania

Ray Hanania is an award-winning columnist, author & former Chicago City Hall reporter (1977-1992). A veteran who served during the Vietnam War and the recipient of four SPJ Peter Lisagor Awards for column writing, Hanania writes weekly opinion columns on mainstream American & Chicagoland topics for the Southwest News-Herald, Des Plaines Valley News, the Regional News, The Reporter Newspapers, and Suburban Chicagoland.  

Hanania also writes about Middle East issues for the Arab News, and The Arab Daily News criticizing government policies in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

A critic of mainstream news media bias, Hanania advocates for peace & justice for Israel & Palestine, & the empowerment of Arabs in America. 

Click here to listen to Ray's Political Podcast. 

Hanania's columns are archived on his personal website at RayHanania.com. Hanania was named "Best Ethnic American Columnist" by the New America Media in November 2007, and is the 2009 recipient of the SPJ National Sigma Delta Chi Award for column writing.

Email Ray Hanania at rghanania@gmail.com.
Ray Hanania

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